Beer Braised Brisket with Onion Gravy

Written by chanie on September 8th, 2013

This post has been a long time in coming. And not just because it’s taken me a while to write it. But because it’s taken me a while to learn it. Like many home cooks, when it came to meat preparation, I was stumped. I didn’t understand the different cuts of meat or how to prepare them. After lots of reading, and a hands-on butchery class at The Center for Kosher Culinary Arts, I feel like I’m finally beginning to understand where my meat comes from and how to cook it. With the holidays upon us, I thought I should share some of that invaluable information with all of you!

So, without further adieu, I give you my Guide to Kosher Meat: Cuts & Cooking Methods!

In my guide, I speak about the different cuts of meat and where they come from on the animal. In a nutshell, tough cuts of meat requires slow, moist heat cooking to help break down the connective tissue and tenderize the meat. Braising, a combination cooking method involving dry and moist heat cooking, is a popular method used.

This deliciously tender brisket is braised with caramelized onions and beer, resulting in a mouthwatering gravy. First cut of brisket will yield a drier, less flavorful dish, while 2nd cut will yield a more tender flavorful meat. If you choose to use 2nd cut of brisket, don’t remove the excess fat until it’s done cooking. As the fat breaks down, it adds moisture and flavor to the meat, so if you want to remove it, it’s best to do so by refrigerating the meat after cooking and removing the congealed fat after it solidifies. In addition, cutting the brisket when it’s cold, minimizes it’s propensity for shredding.

Keep in mind, that since braising is the best method for cooking tough cuts of meat, you can use any tough cut in this recipe such as the French Roast, Chuck Roast, Shoulder Roast, or Deckle.

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74 Comments so far ↓

  1. We beer a lot in chicken recipes, but never tried it with brisket. Must put on the list of recipes to try.

  2. Hindy says:

    I am definitely making that gravy soon!

  3. that caramelized onion gravy looks incredible. and as usual, your photos are beautiful!

  4. Always looking for new brisket recipes. Those onions look amazing!

  5. Ronnie Fein says:

    yep, a delicious classic.

  6. Estie says:

    Made this last week. Its super tasty and delicious!!!

  7. Carmelizd onion in gravy form is my definitely of foodie heaven. What a beautiful recipe!

  8. Love the caramelized onions, such a great touch.

  9. This a dish DH would love – he loves caramelized onions!

  10. Chanie, I want to use this recipe for Sukkot. I got a 3 lb, grass fed French Roast that’s not very fatty. ANy thoughts on if that will change the cooking method or outcome? Thanks!!

  11. Aliza says:

    I have a 5.5 lb brisket that I’m doing like this. But I don’t have a pot that can go in my oven. Can I just transfer it all to a different dish to put it in the oven?

  12. Sent this to a bunch of my friends who made it for chag. They couldn’t stop raving about it! Next is my turn to make it!

  13. this is a perfect holiday dish, looks gorgeous!

  14. Betsy says:

    Loved how simple this was, but I would completely leave out the sugar next time – it was WAY too sweet for my family. Carmelized onions on their own + oktoberfest beer would be fantastic.

  15. Chaya says:

    Just wanted to let you know I made this last week, and everyone loved it! Lots of compliments and no leftovers :) Thank you so much!

  16. Stephanie says:

    Just made this and keep nibbling on the edges. So soft and moist! Hope it lasts until shabbos!

  17. DL says:

    Quick question… I just made this recipe.. But think I might have done something wrong… When you write deglaze the pan… Does that mean I was supposed to take out the carmalized onions and just cook the meat with the beer and vinegar? Hope I didn’t mess up!

  18. Robin says:

    Will this taste good without the sugar? I”m having a guest who doesn’t eat sugar. If not, any other recommendations?

  19. Robin says:

    How many onions? Ingredient list says one, text of recipe says two.

  20. suri says:

    hi chanie,

    i would like to make this. will it be ok for my first cut brisket? i dont want it to be too tough. also, will the meat have a bear taste to it? i need it for my children and adults

  21. suri says:

    thank so much! last question, is it ok for a pregnant woman to eat this roast?
    is the beer cooked down?

  22. Bracha says:

    Can i do this all the oven?

  23. miriam says:

    I have made this a few times and the gravy doesn’t come out looking dark and thick like yours. Its comes out more light and thin. I have put the fire on high to let the sauce thicken but it doesn’t. What am I possibly doing wrong? Also I use regular onions not Spanish. Does that matter?

  24. serokipa says:

    How could a brisket come out good if it’s cooked at a temperature above 250 degrees. Brisket, however prepared, must be in an oven set at a temperature between 215 to 250 and cooked untill it reaches an internal temperature of 190 – 205 (it will usually take between 1 to 2 hours per pound)

    • chanie says:

      Hi Serokipa, I know many people only cook brisket low and slow but this recipe results in a tender brisket and many of my readers have told me it’s their favorite!

  25. Hmm these look delicious, thanks for posting up this recipe, looks quite simple to make.

    Simon

  26. Esther says:

    Can this be frozen, or made a few days in advance? If so, how should it be warmed up?

    • chanie says:

      Yes, definitely. Brisket is actually easier to slice the next day, and won’t shred as much if sliced when cold. You can freeze or refrigerate it, slice, and warm in the sauce.

  27. Chana says:

    Can I omit vinegar?

  28. Chanie Pearlman says:

    If I don’t have apple cider vinegar is there anything else I can use?

  29. Leah says:

    Is chuck eye roast a “tough” meat?

    • chanie says:

      I find it to be quite tender, but make sure it’s not grassfed because grassfed chuck eye is very lean and comes out tough and dry.

  30. brochie says:

    roast came out amazing!!! how do I warm it up so that the slices of meat don’t turn black?

    • chanie says:

      I’ve never heard of meat turning black when you warm it up….just warm in the gravy or add a bit of water or stock to the pot with the slices when reheating.

  31. Danielle says:

    This was the best brisket I’ve ever had! And so easy to make.

  32. Shifra says:

    This recipe looks delicious (and simple). I know the vinegar helps tenderize the meat — is rice vinegar ok to use? Will it still do the trick? Thanks.

  33. Shifra says:

    Also, to add on to my last comment. If rice vinegar wont work, can I use regular vinegar?

  34. Naomi says:

    Hi. You mentioned that 1st cut will be less flavorful and drier. Is there anything to do to make it softer and taste good? I wish I read your blog before buying the meat!

    • chanie says:

      I would suggest not overcooking it, cook until just tender and you can cover it with a few slices of kosher beef bacon to help keep it moist.

  35. brochie spritzer says:

    hi, which other meat can I use for this recipe, would a deckle roast work?
    thanks!

  36. Devorah says:

    I love this recipe- it’s no fail… I have never made brisket successfully until I started using this recipe.

  37. Devorah says:

    Could I use a slow cooker for this? At what temperature / for how long?

    • chanie says:

      I’m fairly certain it would work but it will probably be very liquidy and not very saucy. I would cook it on low until it’s fork-tender, probably 6-8 hours or so.

  38. Ruthie says:

    This is a dumb question–is the onion gravy a diff recipe, or is it whatever is left over in the pot after you cook the meat?

  39. Meira says:

    Hi Chanie,
    Do you think it would be ok to use this recipe for a minute roast?

    • chanie says:

      yes, but you don’t need to bake it as long as the brisket. Also, just so you know, minute roast has a thick sinew down the middle that doesn’t break down during cooking.

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