Category: Main Dish

Leftover Chicken Soup Pot Pie

I’ve got to hand this one over to my favorite Facebook page, “Whats for Supper” (introduced to me by my sister-in-law CR), which was started by two sisters, Chava and Naomie (from what I gather anyway). As the name suggests, each day, they post what they are making for supper, and invite all their followers to do the same. Naomie sometimes suggests interested cooking tips, and the health benefits of various foods. They’ve created a family atmosphere, a place to shmooze about more than just food!

Now back to the food. In one post, a little while back, they offered suggestions of what to do with leftover chicken soup. I always have leftover soup, and it kills me to throw it away! Only one of the recipes appealed to me, and that was chicken pot pie. The delicious, creamy comfort food that we all love (and you thought it couldn’t get any comfier than chicken soup) is surprisingly easy to make. Making chicken pot pie using leftover chicken soup seemed a bit “off” at first, but once I tried it, I couldn’t help but make it again the next week. And it just keeps getting better. If you don’t like the sound of it, you can go ahead and boil up some chicken and carrots from scratch.

If you have other vegetables in your soup, like celery, parsnips etc. feel free to add them. (Almost) anything goes!

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“Everything” London Broil

London Broil is regularly served in my house, mostly on the side of cholent on Shabbos day. Since it is relatively inexpensive, I have started serving it more often during the week. Now lets get things straight. The name London Broil is NOT a cut of meat, but rather a method of preparation. The method? broiling or grilling marinated flank steak, then cutting it across the grain into thin strips. Because the muscle fibers run the entire length of this cut of meat, it can be tough. However, if prepared correctly, the outcome is delicious. To tenderize the meat, I massage it with olive oil and a mix of seasonings. Then, I let it marinate for a few hours. Finally, I broil it until medium (anything more will cause the meat to be tough). It is very important not to score, cut, or penetrate, the meat before (or during) broiling because all the juices will run out of it. It is best served with mashed potatoes, but being as I had an entire container of leftover rattatouille, I wanted to make use of it. I mixed it in with some Mezze Penne for a delicious pasta on the side.

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Chicken Breast with Port Wine Cherry Sauce

So I figure I’ve pushed this off long enough! For as long as I can remember, my husband, family, and friends have been encouraging me to start my own blog. Of course, I procrastinated. Then, I looked for excuses. I’m not a gourmand. Nor a professional photographer. I can’t, I don’t, I’m tired!!! And so weeks turned to months and months into years, and so many beautiful dinners have gone lost in the wind (but not on the scale!) Finally, I’ve decided to do as Nike says, and just “do it!”. So here I am. Typing my first blog post…

Without further ado, I give you, tonights supper….

I’ve long been eyeing the “Turkey Breast with Port Wine Cherry Sauce” recipe from the NEW Jamie Geller cookbook, “Quick & Kosher, Meals in Minutes”. (we’ll leave the cookbook review for another day). I decided to try it out with chicken breast, and although the recipe pairs it with roasted potatoes, I made some simple barley pilaf instead. The results where a simple, tasty meal that came together quickly.


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