l’chaim

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Whiskey Cider

Monday, September 16th, 2013

I’m really not much of a drinker. At all. I can appreciate a nice glass of red wine, but cocktails? I haven’t the faintest clue where to start. The first real cocktail I ever drank was a whiskey sour when I was dating my husband. It was sour all right. And strong. I didn’t hate it all that much and the buzz I got was kinda fun, but drinking is not really my thing.

When the Kosher Connection team decided on the theme “Spread the Joy” for the September link-up, the first thing that came to mind was inviting someone into my Sukkah to make a l’chaim (more on that later). Since whiskey sours are about the only drink I know how to make, I thought about how I could turn it into a sweeter version that celebrates the coming of fall. I decided to sub the sour element with a spiced apple cider syrup – reducing the cider with lots of  autumnesque spices. To get the real holiday buzz, I used equal amounts of whiskey and cider syrup, but if you want to go easy, you can serve the cider nice and warm (you don’t have to reduce it) and add just a splash of whiskey. Either way, you’ve got a delicious buzz-worthy cocktail to share!

First things first – what is a sukkah? A sukkah is a temporary hut constructed for use during the week-long Jewish festival of Sukkot. If you’ve passed by a Jewish neighborhood, you may have seen them topped with branches and decorated with Judaic themes.

I grew up in Brooklyn, in a modest apartment on Eastern Parkway, just a stone’s throw away from the famous 770 synagogue, the central hub of the Chabad movement. Back in the day, The Grand Rebbe of Lubavitch would draw hundreds of thousands of visitors from across the globe, all hoping to be granted a meeting or blessing from him. Living so close to where the Rebbe & his congregants gathered, our Sukkah was a regular stop for family, friends, neighbors and even strangers on their way to the synagogue. As more and more people poured in to our small little hut, it seemed to stretch itself out to accomodate more than it’s physical space. L’chaim’s were poured in abundance as beautiful melodies poured fourth from it’s plastic walls.

My mom would pass her Yom Tov delicacies through the kitchen window, homemade meals of chopped liver, stuffed cabbage, sweet and sour tongue, yerushalmi kugel and other traditional foods which she made from scratch. The smells and tastes of the Chag come back to me each year, as the weather begins to herald the coming of fall, and the leaves begin to show their first signs of browning.

Sukkot is truly a joyous time. And not just because the mess gets left outside, and our homes are filled with delicious food and loving family. But because the emotionally taxing Days of Awe are behind us, and we are certain that we’ve all been inscribed for a happy and healthy year. It’s just the time to take out your shot glasses and spread the joy by inviting others into your humble hut to make a l’chaim.

As for me, I’ll be raising my glass to wonderful memories of a time when people from all walks of life, gathered in our family Sukkah to toast the New Year and all the good things it had in store. May the blessings abound, and may we all merit to raise our glasses to happy occasions!

Related Posts:

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sangria
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It’s our Blogoversary!
Celebrate with {Mulled Wine}

Thursday, January 19th, 2012

We’ve come a long way since my first post back on January 19th, 2011. Believe me, I never imagined I would make it this far. What started out as a hobby has blossomed into a full blown passion. I’m so thankful to all of my readers who are the reason for my continued success.

Over the past year, BIB has grown considerably, with recipes featured throughout the blogosphere as well as in Bitayavon and Binah Magazines. With bated breath, Busy in Brooklyn finished in 5th place in the Joy of Kosher “2011 Best of Kosher” competition with almost 850 votes.

It’s been a whirlwind! Here are some stats from the past year that I thought you might enjoy:

Most popular category: dessert recipes
Most popular recipe: sushi salad
Most popular craft: shell stitch crochet hat
Most popular how to: caramelize apples
Most commented: black bean brownies

I can’t wait to see what the next year has in store! In the meantime, keep reading, keep cooking, and most importantly, keep commenting! Your feedback really gives me the push I need to keep going!

Do you want to give BIB a Blogoversary present? Share our page on your facebook wall and ask friends to like us and visit our blog!

And now, to celebrate! I figured we should all make a L’chaim to toast to our one year Blogoversary. But a plain old glass of wine just wouldn’t do. Instead, we’re gonna click our glasses with a warm cup of mulled wine. Mulled wine is a spiced red wine that has been warmed with spices and citrus. It is perfect for a cold winter night in which you have cause to celebrate.

The best part about making mulled wine (also known as glogg) is that you don’t need to use an expensive bottle. You can use a combination of whatever whole spices you have on hand, or simply use a few spoons of your bisamim.

Traditionally, mulled wine includes the following:

} dry red wine or a combination of dry and sweet (port is best)
} sweetener, such as, white sugar, brown sugar, maple syrup, honey or agave
} juice and zest of citrus, such as orange and/or lemon
} additional alcohol of choice, such as vodka or brandy, (optional)
} dried fruit, raisins, and/or almonds (optional)
} a combination of whole spices, such as:

cinnamon sticks
cardamom pods
cloves
allspice berries
peppercorns
star anise
bay leaves
nutmeg
vanilla pods
ginger root

I prefer to wrap up the spices in a cheesecloth but you can also add them straight to the pot and strain before serving.

 

1 year ago: chicken breast with port wine cherry sauce

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3 Layer Chocolate Cake Martini

Tuesday, October 18th, 2011


With Simchas Torah just around the corner, I just had to include an alcoholic beverage for the ladies. I mean, why should the guys get to have all the fun! We deserve to make a l’chaim, especially after our string of 3-day cooking fests!

More importantly, we have the most special, amazing, heartwarming and miraculous reason to celebrate. The release of Gilad Shalit who has been held captive by Hamas for five long years.

Welcome Home Gilad!


I’m not the biggest drinker, so if I have a martini recipe, it’s because I tasted it somewhere, not because I decided to whip up a cocktail one night :) I recently celebrated my sister-in-law CR’s birthday with a night out on the town. We hit a fun broadway show, but before that, we made sure to stop by Clubhouse Cafe for some appetizers and drinks. With the show just 30 minutes later, we quickly sampled a few of their “snacks” at the bar including duck empanadas, chunky guacamole, grilled kebabs, sliders and chicken fingers. What’s a birthday celebration without a toast, so we ordered cocktails including their chocolate martini, mojito and fruit punch sangria. We finished off our appetizer feast with some real 3 layer chocolate cake (topped off with a candle and a song, of course!) We left Clubhouse just a tad lightheaded and giggly, the perfect starter to the perfect night.

The verdict? While we only feasted on Clubhouse’s snacks and drinks, I must say that the food was fresh, flavorful, well presented, and delicious. The drinks were great, and the chocolate cake was moist and decadent. I would definitely go back, this time however, for a full meal!

As I mentioned, I’m far from a lush, but when I got home, I couldn’t stop thinking about those chocolate martini’s. They were awesome. My sister-in-law, as thoughtful as she is, sent me over some mini bottles of the ingredients so I could create my own at home. And believe you me, I did :) When looking up the cocktail online, I discovered that the martini is actually called three layer chocolate cake. How apropo!

Happy Birthday CR!

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